Deficient in thiamineVitamin B1 (thiamine) is not a rare vitamin. Small amounts can be found in nearly all foods and many foods have substantial amounts of B1, yet an estimated 20% of Americans are found to be deficient in this extremely important and necessary vitamin. The reason? B1 is generally destroyed when a food is processed.

This connection was discovered due to the disease beriberi. This wasting disease, which could lead to death, was known to be caused by inadequate nutrition, but was found to be more prevalent when the population with a limited diet relied on polished rice as a stable. Comparing these populations with others of a similar diet who ate whole grain rice, the link between B1 and beriberi was discovered.

Deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms related to the nervous system, including blindness. Alcoholism and heavy drinking can lead to B1 deficiency for a number of reasons including: poor diet, increased carbohydrate intake (from the alcohol), and damage to intestinal mucosa, which can decrease the absorption of B1 by as much as 90%. It is estimated that 30-80% of alcoholics are deficient in B vitamins.

B1 is one of the essential B vitamins that work in concert with other B vitamins to turn carbohydrates into
glucose, providing energy for the body and brain. It is also necessary for manufacturing fats and metabolizing proteins. It is essential for the nervous system.

Age has an effect on our ability to properly absorb and use B vitamins, therefore supplementation is suggested for those 50 years and older. On-going vomiting or diarrhea will deplete the body’s resources of B1. Gastrointestinal diseases may inhibit B1 absorption.

Foods that interfere with vitamin B1 absorption include any food preserved with sulfides, raw fish, shellfish, coffee, and tea.

B1 is used, of course, to treat B1 deficiencies and can be injected into the body or taken orally. It is also used in treatment for ulcerative colitis, heart disease, diabetic pain, AIDS, canker sores, vision
problems, cataracts, glaucoma, motion sickness, and stress. Some athletes use it to improve performance.

Studies have shown that long term use of any one B vitamin may result in a deficiency in other B vitamins. For this reason, it is best to supplement with B vitamin complex for long term use.

Even if you choose to supplement your vitamin intake, diet is the basis of good health and the primary source of essential nutrients. To ensure your vitamin B1 intake is at a good level, eat a diverse diet of whole unprocessed foods, (80% raw). Whole grains, vegetables (asparagus, brussel sprouts, green peas, beet greens, spinach and sweet potatoes), beans and legumes (navy, black, pinto, lima, kidney, lentils, and peanuts, seeds and nuts (sunflower, sesame, flax), along with watermelon and oranges are all good sources of B1.

Article Source: ww.naturalnews.com/hiamine_vitamin_B1_beriberi

Originally posted 2014-09-22 14:29:14.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Post Navigation