remove bedbugsYou can eliminate bedbugs from your home without chemicals, using traps that can be built for about a dollar’s worth of supplies, say scientists at the University of Florida.

“This concept of trapping works for places where people sleep and need to be protected at those locations,” entomologist Phil Koehler said.

In recent years, bedbugs have become a growing problem across the United States, with the blood-sucking insects turning up in cities nationwide. According to an April 2013 survey by the National Pest Management Association, 99.6 percent of all pest management professionals in the country had encountered at least one bedbug infestation in the previous year. Forty-nine percent of those surveyed said that most infestations occurred during summer.

The association said that summer might be a busy bedbug season because more people are traveling or relocating, and are either bringing bedbugs back into their homes or discovering them in their new location.

Although most famous for living in mattresses and bedding, bedbugs can live in nearly any furniture. Their bites are often confused for mosquito bites or rashes, allowing them to go undetected for long periods of time.

Traps are cheap, safe and effective

Because bedbugs have now become resistant to most pesticides, people often turn to extreme measures to deal with them. But Koehler warns that techniques such as mothballs, bug bombs or pesticide treatment of mattresses are either ineffective or dangerous.

In contrast, the traps are an easy way to both determine if your home has bedbugs, and to eliminate them if an infestation is confirmed. Koehler estimates that it would take about an afternoon to make the 50 traps needed to remove bedbugs from a three-bedroom apartment. Compared with the average $3,000 price tag for bedbug extermination in such a space however, the time investment may be well worth it. It can cost $1,200 to eliminate bedbugs even from a small apartment.

The traps, made with glue, masking tape and inexpensive plastic containers, present the bedbugs with a rough surface that makes it possible for them to get in, but with a smooth surface inside that makes it impossible for them to get out. They are designed to trap the insects as they move from their daytime hiding places in search of victims to feed on.

The simple nature of the traps makes them basically foolproof, Koehler said, and much safer than the alternatives.

“It’s really hard to mess this up to the point that you’d hurt anything,” he said.

Five easy steps
You can find instructions, photos and videos of how to construct the traps on the web site of the university’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. In essence, however, all that is required is:

1. Cut four pieces of rough-surfaced tape into lengths at least the height of a small plastic container.

2. Press the pieces of tape along the inside of the container, evenly spaced.

3. Wrap more tape around the outside of a larger plastic container, from its base to its upper edge.

4. Glue the smaller container inside the larger one, making sure to leave space between the walls of the containers.

5. (optional) Dust the space between the walls of the containers with baby powder.

The bedbugs will be able to climb into the larger container and perhaps even into the smaller one, but will be trapped in the “moat” between the two containers and unable to escape.

The traps should be placed underneath the legs of all furniture in the home, including beds, chairs and sofas. Trapping should continue until no more bedbugs are turning up inside the traps.

Article Source: Bedbugs, pest control & bug traps

Originally posted 2014-10-09 10:42:55.

nappingOkay, so it’s the middle of the afternoon and you’re trying to find a good reason not to take a nap.

You’ve got a lot of work to still do. You don’t want to appear lazy. You’ll just go to bed a little earlier tonight. You think there must be something wrong with you because you always seem to want to doze off this time of day.

Well, what would you say if we told you that napping was not only a good idea, but actually a way to improve your health? It’s true. In fact, a mid-afternoon nap of just 10 minutes or so — some people like to call them “power naps,” but whatever — can help you remain alert for another two hours, which is generally more than enough to let you finish normal work days.

12 tips to help you get the best naps:

— Consider your regular sleep schedule. In Dr. Sara Mednick, Ph.D.’s book Take a Nap!, she notes that the best time to nap depends on when you wake up. Early risers, for instance, who get up around 5:00 a.m. should think about napping around 1:00 p.m.

— Time them for the afternoons. In the late 1980s, researchers began to hone in on the value of napping. One of their early observations about sleeping during the day was that mid-afternoon slumps are just part of the human condition.

— Think ahead. Staying up late (or worse, all night) is not the best thing for you; if you are going to do it, then consider it with the thought of taking a nap the next day.

— Be safe! Sleeping just six or so hours a night, rather than the requisite eight hours, doubles your risk of falling asleep at the wheel. A 30-minute nap has been shown to boost your awareness.

— Preempt that night shift. A study of night workers found that, though an evening nap plus caffeine was one way to stay awake, a nap alone improved alertness, and without the damaging caffeine side effects.

— Nap smarter! There have been a wide range of nap times examined, but for most people, one between 10 and 20 minutes is best.

— Nothing wrong with a wake-up call. “Setting an alarm is really helpful for napping,” said Janet Kennedy, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and founder of NYC Sleep Doctor.

— Nap-happy place. For the perfect nap, you will want to find a dark, quiet place to lie down.

— Meditate. You have been there: You are nearly asleep on your feet, with your eyes still open. But as soon as you get all hunkered down, your mind begins to race. Calm yourself first with meditation techniques such as breathing and visualizations.

— Trust your instincts. Kennedy told The Huffington Post, “Some people just aren’t good nappers.” You’ll just have to get enough sleep the regular way.

— Losing sleep at night? “If a person is having difficulty sleeping at night — either falling asleep or prolonged night waking — I advise against napping at all,” Kennedy said.

— Don’t risk it. Some places just aren’t nap-friendly; is your workplace one of them?

6 nap health benefits:

— Again, napping is a boon to your alertness: A study by NASA found that there were higher measures of alertness in pilots after just a 40-minute nap, when compared to pilots who did not get one. Even just 20 minutes will perk up a shift worker.

— Napping improves learning and retention: It is the deeper rapid eye movement (REM) sleep that has been linked to the cognitive process, so it is no surprise that a longer nap will get you these benefits.

— Napping can increase creativity: If you have ever awakened from a nap, only to solve a problem that has been bugging you, researchers have found that nappers who enter REM have a tendency to do that.

— Napping boosts creativity: Most bosses may not believe this, but science has proven that an afternoon nap is the opposite of laziness at work.

— Lift your spirits: Sleepiness leads to crankiness. Just think about a toddler who hasn’t had a nap.

— Stress reliever: Napping can be a luxury, sure, but just escaping for a short nap can have a wonderfully positive effect on your stress level, which also lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease.

Article Source: Naps are good

Originally posted 2014-08-24 12:03:39.